legalizecannibalism:

kingoftheraindogs:

kemetically-ankhtified:

18 Signs That Life In U.S. Public Schools Is Now Essentially Equivalent To Life In U.S. Prisons
#1 Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli has announced that school officials can search the cell phones and laptops of public  school students if there are “reasonable grounds for suspecting that the  search will turn up evidence  that the student has violated or is  violating either the law or the  rules of the school.”
#2 It came out in court that one school district in Pennsylvania secretly recorded more than 66,000 images of students using webcams that were embedded in school-issued laptops that the students were using at home.
#3 If you can believe it, a “certified TSA official” was recently brought in to oversee student searches at the Santa Fe High School prom.
#4 A few years ago a class of 3rd grade students at one Kentucky elementary school were searched by a group of teachers after 5 dollars went missing.  During the search the students were actually required to remove their shoes and their socks.
#5 At one public school in the Chicago area, children have been banned from bringing their lunches from home.  Yes, you read that correctly.    Students at that particular school are absolutely prohibited from   bringing lunches from home.  Instead, it is mandatory that they eat the   food that the school cafeteria serves.
#6 The U.S.  Department of Agriculture is spending huge amounts of money to  install surveillance cameras in the cafeterias of public schools so  that government control freaks can closely monitor what our children are  eating.
#7 A teenager in suburban Dallas was recently forced to take on a part-time job after being ticketed for using bad language in one high school   classroom.  The original ticket was for $340, but additional fees have   raised the total bill to $637.
#8 It is not just high school kids that are being  ticketed by police.  In  Texas the crackdown extends all the way down to  elementary school  students.  In fact, it has been reported that Texas  police gave “1,000 tickets” to elementary school kids over a recent six year period.
#9 A few months ago, a 17 year-old honor student in  North Carolina named Ashley  Smithwick accidentally took her father’s  lunch with her to school.  It  contained a small paring knife which he  would use to slice up apples.   So what happened to this standout  student when the school discovered  this?  The school suspended her for the rest of the year and the police charged her with a misdemeanor.
#10 A little over a year ago, a 6 year old girl in Florida was handcuffed and sent to a mental facility after throwing temper tantrums at her elementary school.
#11 In early 2010, a 12 year old girl in New York was arrested by police and marched out of her school in handcuffs just because she doodled on her desk. “I love my friends Abby and Faith” was what she reportedly wrote on her desk.
#12 There are actually some public schools in the United States that are so paranoid that they have actually installed cameras in student bathrooms.
#13 Down in Florida, students have actually been arrested by police for bringing a plastic butter knife to school, for throwing an eraser, and for drawing a picture of a gun.
#14 The Florida State Department of Juvenile Justice has announced that it will begin using analysis software to predict crime by young delinquents and will place “potential offenders” in specific prevention and education programs.
#15 A group of high school students made national  headlines a while back when they revealed that they were ordered by a  security guard to stop singing the national anthem during a visit to the Lincoln Memorial.
#16 In some U.S. schools, armed cops accompanied by police dogs actually conduct surprise raids with their guns drawn.  In this video, you can actually see police officers aiming their guns at school children as the students are lined up facing the wall.
#17 Back in 2009, one 8 year old boy in Massachusetts was sent home from school and was forced to undergo a psychological evaluation because he drew a picture of Jesus on the cross.
#18 This year, 13 parents in Duncan, South Carolina were actually ticketed for cheering during a high school graduation.
(number 14 makes me want to destroy computers.)

legalizecannibalism:

kingoftheraindogs:

kemetically-ankhtified:

18 Signs That Life In U.S. Public Schools Is Now Essentially Equivalent To Life In U.S. Prisons

#1 Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli has announced that school officials can search the cell phones and laptops of public school students if there are “reasonable grounds for suspecting that the search will turn up evidence that the student has violated or is violating either the law or the rules of the school.”

#2 It came out in court that one school district in Pennsylvania secretly recorded more than 66,000 images of students using webcams that were embedded in school-issued laptops that the students were using at home.

#3 If you can believe it, a “certified TSA official” was recently brought in to oversee student searches at the Santa Fe High School prom.

#4 A few years ago a class of 3rd grade students at one Kentucky elementary school were searched by a group of teachers after 5 dollars went missing.  During the search the students were actually required to remove their shoes and their socks.

#5 At one public school in the Chicago area, children have been banned from bringing their lunches from home.  Yes, you read that correctly.  Students at that particular school are absolutely prohibited from bringing lunches from home.  Instead, it is mandatory that they eat the food that the school cafeteria serves.

#6 The U.S. Department of Agriculture is spending huge amounts of money to install surveillance cameras in the cafeterias of public schools so that government control freaks can closely monitor what our children are eating.

#7 A teenager in suburban Dallas was recently forced to take on a part-time job after being ticketed for using bad language in one high school classroom.  The original ticket was for $340, but additional fees have raised the total bill to $637.

#8 It is not just high school kids that are being ticketed by police.  In Texas the crackdown extends all the way down to elementary school students.  In fact, it has been reported that Texas police gave “1,000 tickets” to elementary school kids over a recent six year period.

#9 A few months ago, a 17 year-old honor student in North Carolina named Ashley Smithwick accidentally took her father’s lunch with her to school.  It contained a small paring knife which he would use to slice up apples.  So what happened to this standout student when the school discovered this?  The school suspended her for the rest of the year and the police charged her with a misdemeanor.

#10 A little over a year ago, a 6 year old girl in Florida was handcuffed and sent to a mental facility after throwing temper tantrums at her elementary school.

#11 In early 2010, a 12 year old girl in New York was arrested by police and marched out of her school in handcuffs just because she doodled on her desk. “I love my friends Abby and Faith” was what she reportedly wrote on her desk.

#12 There are actually some public schools in the United States that are so paranoid that they have actually installed cameras in student bathrooms.

#13 Down in Florida, students have actually been arrested by police for bringing a plastic butter knife to school, for throwing an eraser, and for drawing a picture of a gun.

#14 The Florida State Department of Juvenile Justice has announced that it will begin using analysis software to predict crime by young delinquents and will place “potential offenders” in specific prevention and education programs.

#15 A group of high school students made national headlines a while back when they revealed that they were ordered by a security guard to stop singing the national anthem during a visit to the Lincoln Memorial.

#16 In some U.S. schools, armed cops accompanied by police dogs actually conduct surprise raids with their guns drawn.  In this video, you can actually see police officers aiming their guns at school children as the students are lined up facing the wall.

#17 Back in 2009, one 8 year old boy in Massachusetts was sent home from school and was forced to undergo a psychological evaluation because he drew a picture of Jesus on the cross.

#18 This year, 13 parents in Duncan, South Carolina were actually ticketed for cheering during a high school graduation.

(number 14 makes me want to destroy computers.)

"Imagine, a room, awash in gasoline. And there are two implacable enemies in that room. One of them has 9,000 matches. The other has 7,000 matches. Each of them is concerned about who’s ahead, who’s stronger. Well, that’s the kind of situation we are actually in. The amount of weapons that are available to the United States and the Soviet Union are so bloated, so grossly in excess of what’s needed to dissuade the other that if it weren’t so tragic, it would be laughable."

Carl Sagan on the nuclear arms race, on ABC News Viewpoint - “The Day After” (1983 (via whatshallwedo)

Veteran’s Day

Tonight I went to my sister’s choral performance up at the University. It was televised there was a great band.

Since it’s Veteran’s Day, it naturally was about remembering soldiers and the survivors of past wars.

Some Most parts were very sad and I almost cried. Two parents stood with the spotlight on them while the woman from the news station talked about their son, and she herself got choked up.

The parts that got me, although I’m a bit hesitant about talking about them, were when it was said that the soldiers are “fighting for the freedom of Americans”. To me, this seems to be the rhetoric that keeps America fighting (and fueling) its wars. The soldiers in the Middle East aren’t fighting for my freedom of speech. They aren’t fighting terrorists off American soil, terrorists who want to become our new dictators. From what I’ve heard about the war in the Middle East, the “War on Terror” if you will, is that it was created by G.W. Bush in order to get a monopoly on their oil. I’m not even sure if this is true. I have no idea. I’ll come back later when I figure this out, and by all means, tell me if I’m wrong. But I know that if soldiers were fighting for my freedom, it wouldn’t be in some other country.

The revolutions going on currently in the Mid East are about liberating those who are oppressed by their long-running and corrupt dictators, and with this I support American involvement.

I understand that the men who fought in the Revolutionary War and WWII and so on were fighting for the freedoms for themselves and for others. My mom’s dad (my grandpa, but I never met him) fought in the Battle of the Bulge. He was fighting for the freedoms of those persecuted by the Nazis.

Phew, wow. Now to move on to another subject.

A lot of the songs had a lot to do with God and the Lord and the resurrection of Jesus and they bugged me. They also said numerous amounts prayers, something I don’t think should have been done where the government was so clearly involved. But what are ya gonna do?

The performance was lovely and the music was both moving and swingin’ (they sang “In the Mood” by Glenn Miller!).

I really want to see the meteor shower tonight, but it’s fairly overcast and pretty much freezing outside.

In other news, I finished my hat!

So apparently the rights of Americans contradict each other.

A gay citizen is refused the right to pursue happiness due to Proposition 8.

How did I just realize this today?


Stereo image of President Abraham Lincoln’s funeral, 1865.

This is in my AP textbook. Really cool.
Via Library of Congress

Stereo image of President Abraham Lincoln’s funeral, 1865.

This is in my AP textbook. Really cool.

Via Library of Congress


10 Most Fascinating Holes on Earth
Bingham Canyon Mine is the largest man-made excavation on earth. Also  called Kennecott Copper Mine, it is an open-pit mine located in Salt  Lake County, Utah. It is easily visible as a large layered multi-color,  barren protrusion on the side of the Oquirrh Mountains, which lie on the  west side of the Salt Lake Valley. It is currently the largest open-pit  mine in the world, and the world’s largest man-made excavation. The  mine is 2½ miles across, and ¾ mile deep.Kennecott is the second  largest copper producer in the United States - providing approximately  15% of the country’s copper needs. Minerals were first discovered in  Bingham Canyon in 1850, but exploitation did not begin until 1863. At  first, mining was difficult, but a railroad reached the canyon in 1873,  prompting massive settlement and extraction of the minerals. By the  1920s, 15,000 people of widely-varying ethnicity had settled in the  canyon. Large residential communities were constructed on the steep  canyon walls. Natural disasters were a common occurrence in the  heavily-settled canyon. The population declined rapidly as mining  techniques improved, and several of the mining camps began to be  swallowed up by the mine. By 1980, when Lark was dismantled, only  Copperton, at the mouth of Bingham Canyon and with a population of 800,  remained. Today, mining operations continue at full-swing in the mine,  and it is now the largest open-pit mine in the world.
(Link)

10 Most Fascinating Holes on Earth

Bingham Canyon Mine is the largest man-made excavation on earth. Also called Kennecott Copper Mine, it is an open-pit mine located in Salt Lake County, Utah. It is easily visible as a large layered multi-color, barren protrusion on the side of the Oquirrh Mountains, which lie on the west side of the Salt Lake Valley. It is currently the largest open-pit mine in the world, and the world’s largest man-made excavation. The mine is 2½ miles across, and ¾ mile deep.
Kennecott is the second largest copper producer in the United States - providing approximately 15% of the country’s copper needs. Minerals were first discovered in Bingham Canyon in 1850, but exploitation did not begin until 1863. At first, mining was difficult, but a railroad reached the canyon in 1873, prompting massive settlement and extraction of the minerals. By the 1920s, 15,000 people of widely-varying ethnicity had settled in the canyon. Large residential communities were constructed on the steep canyon walls. Natural disasters were a common occurrence in the heavily-settled canyon. The population declined rapidly as mining techniques improved, and several of the mining camps began to be swallowed up by the mine. By 1980, when Lark was dismantled, only Copperton, at the mouth of Bingham Canyon and with a population of 800, remained. Today, mining operations continue at full-swing in the mine, and it is now the largest open-pit mine in the world.

My cousin just sent this to me on facebook as a gift

this is a pretty great gift

me gusta

This is long, but well worth it. I never really understood the amount of tension there was between the Soviet Union and the U.S. between the end of WWII and 1989. What an eye opener. We’ve come so far.

As November draws nearer, I can’t help but get a little antsy.

I think Obama is doing a better-than-good job as president and I think he should be elected for a second term. Mitt Romney just isn’t the right choice in my opinion, and I remember reading a column in the opinion section of the newspaper about Obama and racism.

By electing someone like Mitt Romney, (white, conservative, etc.) it would be “fixing” a problem caused by Obama’s very existence as president. We’d be electing someone who is white again, and there we go, someone white again. Problem solved. On with life.

America is such a backward nation already, with its wacky drug and marriage laws and views on science and its reliability. I think that Romney could only keep us in that state of backwardness - Obama is taking steps to make America a freer place for a lot of people. No candidate is perfect, but Romney sure doesn’t take the cake with me.

Mitt Romney is way over there on the right and a tad extreme in my opinion (a definite no-no because of his old-world views on marriage) but I have to remind myself that there’s a chance that he could be elected. I can’t be living in a little bubble where I say to myself “Nah, that’ll never happen!” because it could. There are lots of people that support him. There are also lots of people who support Obama.

It’s going to be very interesting, this election.

futurejournalismproject:

(In)tolerance
A poll released today by the Arab American Institute explores attitudes Americans have toward Arabs and Muslims. 
“The data extracted,” the Institute writes, ”indicates that anti-Arab and anti-Muslim political rhetoric has taken a toll on American public opinion, especially along age and party lines.”
Takeaways from the report:

1. Arabs, Muslims, Arab Americans, and American Muslims have the lowest favorable/highest unfavorable ratings among the groups covered.
2. Muslims were the only group with a net unfavorable rating.
3. Note that one in five Americans were either unfamiliar with or not sure of their attitudes toward these communities.
4. Sikhs and Mormons also fare poorly, but in the case of Sikhs, one in four Americans are “unfamiliar” or “not sure”.
5. There is a deep generational divide, which is reflected in a partisan divide.
6. Younger Americans (18-25) rate Arabs and Muslims up to 17 points higher than the older generation. They also rate Arab Americans and American Muslims higher as well.
7. Younger Americans rate Catholics and the various Protestant denominations covered in the survey almost 20 points lower than do older Americans (65+). The younger group also rates Mormons 15 points lower.
8. This is reflected in a deep partisan divide and even more so in a division between those who describe themselves as Obama or Romney voters. For example, note how the ratings given to Arabs and Muslims by Obama and Romney voters are mirror reflections of each other. While Obama voters give Arabs a net 51%/29% favorable rating and Muslims a net 53%/29% rating; Romney voters give Arabs a 30%/50% net unfavorable rating and Muslims a 25%/57% unfavorable rating.
9. Democrats and Obama voters give no group a net negative rating. Republicans and Romney voters only give strong negative ratings to Arabs, Muslims, Arab Americans, and American Muslims.

Image: Detail from The American Divide: How We View Arabs and Muslims.Select to embiggen.

futurejournalismproject:

(In)tolerance

poll released today by the Arab American Institute explores attitudes Americans have toward Arabs and Muslims. 

“The data extracted,” the Institute writes, ”indicates that anti-Arab and anti-Muslim political rhetoric has taken a toll on American public opinion, especially along age and party lines.”

Takeaways from the report:

1. Arabs, Muslims, Arab Americans, and American Muslims have the lowest favorable/highest unfavorable ratings among the groups covered.

2. Muslims were the only group with a net unfavorable rating.

3. Note that one in five Americans were either unfamiliar with or not sure of their attitudes toward these communities.

4. Sikhs and Mormons also fare poorly, but in the case of Sikhs, one in four Americans are “unfamiliar” or “not sure”.

5. There is a deep generational divide, which is reflected in a partisan divide.

6. Younger Americans (18-25) rate Arabs and Muslims up to 17 points higher than the older generation. They also rate Arab Americans and American Muslims higher as well.

7. Younger Americans rate Catholics and the various Protestant denominations covered in the survey almost 20 points lower than do older Americans (65+). The younger group also rates Mormons 15 points lower.

8. This is reflected in a deep partisan divide and even more so in a division between those who describe themselves as Obama or Romney voters. For example, note how the ratings given to Arabs and Muslims by Obama and Romney voters are mirror reflections of each other. While Obama voters give Arabs a net 51%/29% favorable rating and Muslims a net 53%/29% rating; Romney voters give Arabs a 30%/50% net unfavorable rating and Muslims a 25%/57% unfavorable rating.

9. Democrats and Obama voters give no group a net negative rating. Republicans and Romney voters only give strong negative ratings to Arabs, Muslims, Arab Americans, and American Muslims.

Image: Detail from The American Divide: How We View Arabs and Muslims.
Select to embiggen.

July 4, 1992 Carl Sagan speaks at Monticello’s July 4th Celebration and Naturalization Ceremony
The late world-famous Astonomer Carl Sagan, author of “Cosmos,” spoke to Monticello’s new citizens July 4, 1992. Professor Sagan was recognized for not only advancing the field of planetary science, but also for sharing his knowledge and enthusiasm with ordinary Americans.

"…And so it seems to me that part of the duty of citizenship is not to be intimidated into conformity, to be skeptical. I wish that the oath of citizenship that you are about to take in the next few minutes included something like, ‘I promise to question everything my leaders tell me.’ That would really be Jeffersonian. I promise to use my critical faculties. I promise to develop my independence of thought. I promise to educate myself so I can make independent judgements.’ And if these statements are not part of the oath, you can nevertheless make such promises. And such promises, it seems to me, would be a gift that you can make your country."

Via Flickr
I just love that Carl did this. He was such a passionate person.

July 4, 1992 Carl Sagan speaks at Monticello’s July 4th Celebration and Naturalization Ceremony

The late world-famous Astonomer Carl Sagan, author of “Cosmos,” spoke to Monticello’s new citizens July 4, 1992. Professor Sagan was recognized for not only advancing the field of planetary science, but also for sharing his knowledge and enthusiasm with ordinary Americans.

"…And so it seems to me that part of the duty of citizenship is not to be intimidated into conformity, to be skeptical. I wish that the oath of citizenship that you are about to take in the next few minutes included something like, ‘I promise to question everything my leaders tell me.’ That would really be Jeffersonian. I promise to use my critical faculties. I promise to develop my independence of thought. I promise to educate myself so I can make independent judgements.’ And if these statements are not part of the oath, you can nevertheless make such promises. And such promises, it seems to me, would be a gift that you can make your country."

Via Flickr

I just love that Carl did this. He was such a passionate person.