bitchville:

Incredibly Colourful Magnified Grains of Sand
Viewed at an astounding magnification of over 250 times, tiny grains of  sand are surprisingly colorful and extremely unique. Each piece is  either a fragment of crystals, spiral fragments of shells or crumbs of  volcanic rock. To see these incredible images, Dr. Gary Greenberg goes through a  painstakingly lengthy process. First he takes many photos from different  points of focus. Then, he combines them using software to produce one  spectacular image. “It is incredible to think when you are walking on the beach you are standing on these tiny treasures,” says Greenberg.”
via http://sandgrains.com/ and ISI

bitchville:

Incredibly Colourful Magnified Grains of Sand

Viewed at an astounding magnification of over 250 times, tiny grains of sand are surprisingly colorful and extremely unique. Each piece is either a fragment of crystals, spiral fragments of shells or crumbs of volcanic rock.

To see these incredible images, Dr. Gary Greenberg goes through a painstakingly lengthy process. First he takes many photos from different points of focus. Then, he combines them using software to produce one spectacular image.

“It is incredible to think when you are walking on the beach you are standing on these tiny treasures,” says Greenberg.”

via http://sandgrains.com/ and ISI

cosmosplasma:

Nature is more than a scientist, an engineer… it’s an artist, in the grandest of scales.

14-billion-years-later:

The Logarithmic Spiral

Now all you guys who are like “Yeah man the Fibonacci spiral is awesome” can just take a back seat here, because here we have the coolest of all spirals: the logarithmic spiral. Truth be told just about every time you’ve heard someone talk about the Fibonacci (or more accurately known Golden Spiral) they’ve been talking about this guy and just not realized it. The logarithmic spiral is given by the equation r=ae^(bθ) where r is the radius, a & b are positive constants and θ is the angle around the origin.

The logarithmic spiral also pops up quite often in nature, being the mathematical pattern behind such things as nautilus shells, Romanesco broccoli, spiral galaxies, the Mandelbrot set, storms, ferns and even sea horses.


Aurora Queen
Northern lights from Finland. Aurora is a natural colored light display in the sky, particularly in the polar zone, which is produced by the collision of charged particles from Earth’s magnetosphere, mostly electrons but also protons and heavier particles, with atoms and molecules of Earth’s atmosphere (at altitudes above 80 km). The particles originate from the Sun and reach the Earth in the stream of solar wind.
Copyright: Pekka Parviainen/TWAN

Aurora Queen

Northern lights from Finland. Aurora is a natural colored light display in the sky, particularly in the polar zone, which is produced by the collision of charged particles from Earth’s magnetosphere, mostly electrons but also protons and heavier particles, with atoms and molecules of Earth’s atmosphere (at altitudes above 80 km). The particles originate from the Sun and reach the Earth in the stream of solar wind.

Copyright: Pekka Parviainen/TWAN

electricorchid:

The large forest gecko (Gekko smithii) is a lizard from the forests of South-East Asia. In bright light, the blue-green iris of the gecko’s eye constricts to form a slit-shaped pupil featuring four tiny pinholes. These are thought to decrease the amount of light that enters the eye as well as the depth of field, giving the lizard better distance estimation in bright light.  | + 

electricorchid:

The large forest gecko (Gekko smithii) is a lizard from the forests of South-East Asia. In bright light, the blue-green iris of the gecko’s eye constricts to form a slit-shaped pupil featuring four tiny pinholes. These are thought to decrease the amount of light that enters the eye as well as the depth of field, giving the lizard better distance estimation in bright light.  | + 

Vespa Mandarinia Japonica

It’s the size of your thumb and it can spray flesh-melting poison. We really wish we were making that up for, you know, dramatic effect because goddamn, what a terrible thing a three-inch acid-shooting hornet would be, you know? Oh, hey, did we mention it shoots it into your eyes? Or that the poison also has a pheromone cocktail in it that’ll call every hornet in the hive to come over and sting you until you are no longer alive? Think you can outrun it? It can fly 50 miles in a day.

Here’s how the Japanese hornet treats other insects (and would presumably treat us, if we were small enough). An adult hornet will fly miles to find some squishy shit to feed to its children. Often times, it finds its food in, say, a hive inhabited by thousands of bees.

What to do? Well, Vespa japonica sprays the nest with some of the acid/pheromone and brings in reinforcements, usually consisting of 30 or so fellow hornets. They then descend upon the beehive like an unholy plague of hell-born death engines.

Moral of The Story? Nature can be Hardcore

Oh my fucking sagan I froze when I saw that size comparison picture.

cwnl:

Sparkle Motion
The bioluminescent algae Noctiluca scintillans is also known as “sea sparkle” because of its magical appearance. These dinoflagellates become illuminated when they are disturbed by motion in the water — whether it’s the result of natural waves or a fish swimming by. The above romantic “light display” was created by the photographer moving an object through the water in a heart shape.
Credit: ArtTomCat | shutterstock

cwnl:

Sparkle Motion

The bioluminescent algae Noctiluca scintillans is also known as “sea sparkle” because of its magical appearance. These dinoflagellates become illuminated when they are disturbed by motion in the water — whether it’s the result of natural waves or a fish swimming by. The above romantic “light display” was created by the photographer moving an object through the water in a heart shape.

Credit: ArtTomCat | shutterstock

cwnl:

The Majestic Circumzenithal Arcs

The circumzenithal arc, CZA, is the most beautiful of all the halos. The first sighting is always a surprise, an ethereal rainbow fled from its watery origins and wrapped improbably about the zenith. It is often described as an “upside down rainbow” by first timers. Someone also charmingly likened it to “a grin in the sky”.

Look straight up near to the zenith when the sun if fairly low and especially if sundogs are visible. The centre of the bow always sunwards and red is on the outside.

cwnl:

Auroras At The Lake
by Steve Milner

cwnl:

Auroras At The Lake

by Steve Milner

cwnl:

Walking on Air
The colorful “bubble” is a glory, and the shadow is a Brocken spectre. They’re caused primarily by diffraction processes. The minute droplets in the layer of fog deflect sunlight in such a way to produce concentric rings and overlapping colors. Like a rainbow, you can only see a glory or a Brocken spectre at the antisolar point.
Because shadows converge at the antisolar point, when photographing Brocken spectres and glories the shadow of the photographer will usually be included; not as a blur in the background but as the center of attention (the glorified observer). Glories are commonly seen from airplanes when taking off or landing through a cloud deck.
Summary & Photography by Luc Perrot; Luc’s Website

cwnl:

Walking on Air

The colorful “bubble” is a glory, and the shadow is a Brocken spectre. They’re caused primarily by diffraction processes. The minute droplets in the layer of fog deflect sunlight in such a way to produce concentric rings and overlapping colors. Like a rainbow, you can only see a glory or a Brocken spectre at the antisolar point.

Because shadows converge at the antisolar point, when photographing Brocken spectres and glories the shadow of the photographer will usually be included; not as a blur in the background but as the center of attention (the glorified observer). Glories are commonly seen from airplanes when taking off or landing through a cloud deck.

Summary & Photography by Luc Perrot; Luc’s Website

mothernaturenetwork:

Scientists discover ‘jealous’ hermaphrodite shrimp that murder each otherThe shrimp are only vulnerable to attack right after they have molted, when their skin is too thin to survive assault.

Science!

mothernaturenetwork:

Scientists discover ‘jealous’ hermaphrodite shrimp that murder each other
The shrimp are only vulnerable to attack right after they have molted, when their skin is too thin to survive assault.

Science!

youwonannaward:

“Recognize that the very molecules that make up your body, the atoms that construct the molecules, are traceable to the crucibles that were once the centers of high mass stars that exploded their chemically rich guts into the galaxy, enriching pristine gas clouds with the chemistry of life. So…