fuckyeahtheuniverse:

The Sombrero Galaxy in Infrared

fuckyeahtheuniverse:

The Sombrero Galaxy in Infrared

cwnl:

Galaxy Dwingeloo 1 Emerges

If you look closely at the center of the above photograph, you will see a whole spiral galaxy behind the field of stars. Named Dwingeloo 1, this nearby galaxy was only discovered recently (1994) because much of its light was obscured by dust, gas and bright stars of our own Milky Way Galaxy.

Credit: G. S. Hughes, & S. Maddox (RGO) et al., Isaac Newton Telescope

cwnl:

Galaxy Dwingeloo 1 Emerges

If you look closely at the center of the above photograph, you will see a whole spiral galaxy behind the field of stars. Named Dwingeloo 1, this nearby galaxy was only discovered recently (1994) because much of its light was obscured by dust, gas and bright stars of our own Milky Way Galaxy.

Credit: G. S. Hughes, & S. Maddox (RGO) et al., Isaac Newton Telescope

galaxyshmalaxy:

M51 - Whirlpool Galaxy (by Pegaso0970)

galaxyshmalaxy:

M51 - Whirlpool Galaxy (by Pegaso0970)

lookatthesefuckinstars:

some really great images of space and the cool shit that happens there.

jtotheizzoe:

Astrophysicists have finally simulated an entire galaxy. It only took nine months of computing to do it, too!
We were talking about how spiral galaxies form the other day, and simulations like this are key to checking our understanding of the processes behind the Milky Way and others. Essentially, they take all the applicable laws of physics and astronomy, dump them in a computer, let it build a galaxy and see if it matches what we see in real life.
I’d say they did pretty well!
(via UCSC)

jtotheizzoe:

Astrophysicists have finally simulated an entire galaxy. It only took nine months of computing to do it, too!

We were talking about how spiral galaxies form the other day, and simulations like this are key to checking our understanding of the processes behind the Milky Way and others. Essentially, they take all the applicable laws of physics and astronomy, dump them in a computer, let it build a galaxy and see if it matches what we see in real life.

I’d say they did pretty well!

(via UCSC)

genuhveeev:

last one.gn xx 

genuhveeev:

last one.
gn xx 

missjmercer:

Word.

missjmercer:

Word.

cwnl:

The Whirlpool Galaxy in Infrared Dust
How do spiral galaxies form stars? To help find out, the Hubble Space Telescope imaged the nearby photogenic spiral M51 in infrared light to highlight the dust that traces the dense gas that best forms stars. To further isolate the dust, much of the optical light from stars has also been digitally removed. The resulting unique image shows swirling and intricate patterns on the longest scales, while numerous bright clumps of previously hidden open star clusters appear on the smaller scales. To see the detailed optical light image for comparison, run your cursor over the above image. Anyone with a good pair of binoculars can see the Whirlpool toward the constellation of the Hunting Dogs (Canes Venatici). M51 lies about 30 million light years away, while the above imaged area spans about 15,000 light years from top to bottom. Astronomers speculate that M51’s spiral structure is primarily due to its gravitational interaction with a neighboring smaller galaxy.
Credit: Infrared: NASA, ESA, M. Regan & B. Whitmore (STScI), & R. Chandar (U. Toledo);

cwnl:

The Whirlpool Galaxy in Infrared Dust

How do spiral galaxies form stars? To help find out, the Hubble Space Telescope imaged the nearby photogenic spiral M51 in infrared light to highlight the dust that traces the dense gas that best forms stars. To further isolate the dust, much of the optical light from stars has also been digitally removed. The resulting unique image shows swirling and intricate patterns on the longest scales, while numerous bright clumps of previously hidden open star clusters appear on the smaller scales. To see the detailed optical light image for comparison, run your cursor over the above image. Anyone with a good pair of binoculars can see the Whirlpool toward the constellation of the Hunting Dogs (Canes Venatici). M51 lies about 30 million light years away, while the above imaged area spans about 15,000 light years from top to bottom. Astronomers speculate that M51’s spiral structure is primarily due to its gravitational interaction with a neighboring smaller galaxy.

Credit: Infrared: NASA, ESA, M. Regan & B. Whitmore (STScI), & R. Chandar (U. Toledo);

violent-buddhist:

challengerbeatscamaro:

The most important image ever taken..Every single speck of light you see is a galaxy, not a star.This picture was taken looking at a completely blank spot of the sky, about the size of the tip of your pinky finger, if looking up at night.

 
Our own Milky Way is a spiral galaxy. These are much more massive than the relatively tiny dwarf galaxies, and contain hundreds of billions of stars. For example, the Milky Way contains 200 billion stars – 200,000,000,000 stars. The nearby Andromeda galaxy is much more massive than the Milky Way and contains 1 trillion stars; 5 times as many stars as the Milky Way.
The largest galaxies in the Universe are known as ellipticals. These enormous galaxies have lost their spiral shape through many interactions between large galaxies. They’re found at the cores of the largest galaxy clusters. The biggest galaxy ever discovered is inside the Abell 2029 cluster and contains 100 trillion stars. That’s 100,000,000,000,000 stars.
And just think, there are 100 billion galaxies in the observable Universe. When you put those numbers together, you get an estimate of 1024 stars in the entire Universe. Or a 1 followed by 24 zeroes. That’s 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 stars.

I’ve always loved this picture so much. I think the first time I saw it I didn’t understand the scale of things - I thought a nebula was generally the size of a galaxy (before I took even a remote interest in astronomy), and I didn’t understand how far away things are (I thought you came very close to the moon when you went in an airplane). But this image remains in my top five of most awe-inspiring photographs in astronomy.

violent-buddhist:

challengerbeatscamaro:

The most important image ever taken..
Every single speck of light you see is a galaxy, not a star.
This picture was taken looking at a completely blank spot of the sky, about the size of the tip of your pinky finger, if looking up at night.

Our own Milky Way is a spiral galaxy. These are much more massive than the relatively tiny dwarf galaxies, and contain hundreds of billions of stars. For example, the Milky Way contains 200 billion stars – 200,000,000,000 stars. The nearby Andromeda galaxy is much more massive than the Milky Way and contains 1 trillion stars; 5 times as many stars as the Milky Way.

The largest galaxies in the Universe are known as ellipticals. These enormous galaxies have lost their spiral shape through many interactions between large galaxies. They’re found at the cores of the largest galaxy clusters. The biggest galaxy ever discovered is inside the Abell 2029 cluster and contains 100 trillion stars. That’s 100,000,000,000,000 stars.

And just think, there are 100 billion galaxies in the observable Universe. When you put those numbers together, you get an estimate of 1024 stars in the entire Universe. Or a 1 followed by 24 zeroes. That’s 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 stars.

I’ve always loved this picture so much. I think the first time I saw it I didn’t understand the scale of things - I thought a nebula was generally the size of a galaxy (before I took even a remote interest in astronomy), and I didn’t understand how far away things are (I thought you came very close to the moon when you went in an airplane). But this image remains in my top five of most awe-inspiring photographs in astronomy.