Yes sir.

Yes sir.

Slogan Maker quotes….

"You’re never alone with a Carl Sagan."

"You’ve got questions. We’ve got Carl Sagan."

"There ain’t no party like a Carl Sagan party."

"Maybe she’s born with it, maybe it’s Carl Sagan."

"Come to Carl Sagan, and let’s get it done."

"It’s better when you’re in Carl Sagan."

"Bet you can’t eat Carl Sagan."

How do YOU say it?

How do you say Io? Ee-oh? Eye-oh?

I’ve been saying ‘eye-oh’ since I read in Cosmos it’s actually pronounced ‘ee-oh’.

I was a sad duck when I read that.

fuckyeahtheuniverse:

The Sombrero Galaxy in Infrared

fuckyeahtheuniverse:

The Sombrero Galaxy in Infrared

Elegant, mysterious. I hope I live to see humans walk and live here.

Elegant, mysterious. I hope I live to see humans walk and live here.

Reblog if Carl Sagan still makes you cry.

project-argus:

kaiyves:

incomprehensibleuniverse:

Yup.

Yes. 

Yep.

Oh ho yeah.

crankynerd:

(via BadAstronomy)

450 million light years away are two interacting galaxies. Both spirals, they are caught in each other’s gravitational claws. Already distorted and bound, eventually, to merge into one larger galaxy in a few million years, the view we have of them from Earth is both amazing and lovely… and hey: they’re punctuating their own predicament!

scipsy:

A giant cosmic necklace glows brightly in this NASA Hubble Space Telescope image. The object, aptly named the Necklace Nebula, is a recently discovered planetary nebula, the glowing remains of an ordinary, Sun-like star. The nebula consists of a bright ring, measuring 12 trillion miles across, dotted with dense, bright knots of gas that resemble diamonds in a necklace. The knots glow brightly due to absorption of ultraviolet light from the central stars. The Necklace Nebula is located 15,000 light-years away in the constellation Sagitta (the Arrow). In this composite image, taken on July 2, 2011, Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 captured the glow of hydrogen (blue), oxygen (green), and nitrogen (red) (via Hubble)

scipsy:

A giant cosmic necklace glows brightly in this NASA Hubble Space Telescope image. The object, aptly named the Necklace Nebula, is a recently discovered planetary nebula, the glowing remains of an ordinary, Sun-like star. The nebula consists of a bright ring, measuring 12 trillion miles across, dotted with dense, bright knots of gas that resemble diamonds in a necklace. The knots glow brightly due to absorption of ultraviolet light from the central stars. The Necklace Nebula is located 15,000 light-years away in the constellation Sagitta (the Arrow). In this composite image, taken on July 2, 2011, Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 captured the glow of hydrogen (blue), oxygen (green), and nitrogen (red) (via Hubble)

Getting Cosmos on Monday

Meteor shower tonight

When I was little, my dad said to me:

  • Dad: The sun has a lot of energy - it's very powerful.
  • Me: More powerful than... 10 light bulbs?
  • Dad: Yep.
  • Me: More powerful than... 100 LIGHT BULBS?
  • Dad: Oh yeah.
  • Me: WOAH!
"A handful of sand contains about 10,000 grains, more than the number of stars we can see with the naked eye on a clear night. But the number of stars we can see is only the tiniest fraction of the number of stars there are. What we see at night is the merest smattering of the nearest stars. Meanwhile the Cosmos is rich beyond measure: the total number of stars in the universe is greater than all the grains of sand on all the beaches of the planet Earth.”-Carl Sagan, Cosmos

"A handful of sand contains about 10,000 grains, more than the number of stars we can see with the naked eye on a clear night. But the number of stars we can see is only the tiniest fraction of the number of stars there are. What we see at night is the merest smattering of the nearest stars. Meanwhile the Cosmos is rich beyond measure: the total number of stars in the universe is greater than all the grains of sand on all the beaches of the planet Earth.”

-Carl Sagan, Cosmos