cwnl:

Burnin’ for You
The ISS Progress 42P supply vehicle (Russian designation M-10M) streaks across the sky after undocking from the International Space Station on October 29, 2011, as seen by astronauts on the ISS. The unmanned spacecraft is sent to the ISS carrying supplies, but after transferring the supplies, the crew fills the empty spacecraft with refuse, and sends it hurtling Earthward, incinerating both the spent spacecraft and the refuse. —Tom Chao
Credit: ISS Crew Earth Observations/Image Science & Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center

cwnl:

Burnin’ for You

The ISS Progress 42P supply vehicle (Russian designation M-10M) streaks across the sky after undocking from the International Space Station on October 29, 2011, as seen by astronauts on the ISS. The unmanned spacecraft is sent to the ISS carrying supplies, but after transferring the supplies, the crew fills the empty spacecraft with refuse, and sends it hurtling Earthward, incinerating both the spent spacecraft and the refuse. —Tom Chao

Credit: ISS Crew Earth Observations/Image Science & Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center

cwnl:

Table of Astronomy
by inspyretash-stock

cwnl:

Table of Astronomy

by inspyretash-stock

realcleverscience:

Must See! (See another great video about the stuff here.)

For those who haven’t seen or read about NeverWet yet, it’s really worth a look! While I’m waiting to hear more about its performance, ease of use (i.e. the application process), and how safe it is for people and the environment (always an important concern), still, this is pretty awesome stuff and an awesome example of future technology. Personally, as I continue to realize just how useful it would be, I would probably put it in my top 5 greatest inventions of the year - which is not something I say lightly.

It’s weird to think that in a few years we might not see things get wet or dirty anymore - e.g. Shirts, pants, coats, windows, electronics[!!!]. It’s one of those “small” things that’s actually huge. Imagine standing in the rain, listening to your ipod, taking photos, and simply not getting wet. You go back inside, your clothes are dry, your electronics are fine, and you just continue to go about your day. Hell, even your glasses aren’t wet. Pretty amazing potential!

This could be the end of coasters - and any worries about patio furniture being harmed by rain. Or how about showers with a floor that never gets slippery? Also, it could potentially be a huge boon for the solar industry bc it also makes surfaces self-cleaning, thus requiring less maintenance and improving energy yields. (See here, at 1:30.) Not to mention keeping your windshield dry and skyscraper windows clean. Additionally, bc it’s moisture resistant, it helps make surfaces antibacterial. And because it’s hydrophobic, it’s difficult for ice to form on it as well, which is amazing for things like airplanes and those steps outside your house in the winter. This stuff could really transform so much of our daily lives. (I wonder if it could help boats move faster by reducing friction and drag in the water?!)

Science!

In case, like me, you’re now wondering how quickly you can get your hands on this stuff, there’s good news and bad news: Mid 2012. Not too far, but sure feels like it!

Wow!


Comet Lovejoy & The Laser
Comet Lovejoy is seen passing behind the VLT-Laser Guide Star as a waning Crescent Moon enjoys a spotlight in this image.
Copyright: Gabriel Brammer

Comet Lovejoy & The Laser

Comet Lovejoy is seen passing behind the VLT-Laser Guide Star as a waning Crescent Moon enjoys a spotlight in this image.

Copyright: Gabriel Brammer

cwnl:

Lasers Measure Earth’s Rotation and Wobble
The Earth spins around once every 24 hours on its axis, creating the continuous cycle of day and night. But this rotation isn’t as straightforward as it sounds: Forces large and small cause the Earth to wobble as it spins. This wobbling can pose a problem for navigation systems like GPS.
Scientists working with lasers and mirrors are refining a new system to track the Earth’s rotation and its kinks.
The pull of gravity from the sun and the moon contribute to the planet’s wobble. So do variations in atmospheric pressure, ocean loading and the wind, which change the position of the Earth’s axis relative to the surface. Together their effect is called the Chandler wobble, and it has a period of 435 days.
Another force causes the rotational axis to move over a period of a year. This “annual wobble” is due to the Earth’s elliptical orbit around the sun.

cwnl:

Lasers Measure Earth’s Rotation and Wobble

The Earth spins around once every 24 hours on its axis, creating the continuous cycle of day and night. But this rotation isn’t as straightforward as it sounds: Forces large and small cause the Earth to wobble as it spins. This wobbling can pose a problem for navigation systems like GPS.

Scientists working with lasers and mirrors are refining a new system to track the Earth’s rotation and its kinks.

The pull of gravity from the sun and the moon contribute to the planet’s wobble. So do variations in atmospheric pressure, ocean loading and the wind, which change the position of the Earth’s axis relative to the surface. Together their effect is called the Chandler wobble, and it has a period of 435 days.

Another force causes the rotational axis to move over a period of a year. This “annual wobble” is due to the Earth’s elliptical orbit around the sun.

skepttv:

Bone Like Material from 3D Printer

Researchers have used a 3D printer to create a bone-like material that can be used in orthopedic procedures, dental work and to deliver medicine for treating osteoporosis.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news-Bone-Like-Material-from-3D-Printer-113011.aspx

mothernaturenetwork:

Leaping lizards may lead to the next generation of robotsBy studying lizard agility, researchers hope to make better search-and-rescue and bomb detecting robots.

mothernaturenetwork:

Leaping lizards may lead to the next generation of robots
By studying lizard agility, researchers hope to make better search-and-rescue and bomb detecting robots.

the-star-stuff:

3D Imaging Technique Brings 50 Million-Year-Old Spider to Glorious, Gory Life

Medical researchers typically use Very High Resolution X-Ray Computed Tomography to compose three-dimensional images of soft tissue. The technique is especially useful for studying cancer, allowing tumors to be modeled in incredible detail. So what happens when you unleash VHR-CT on, say, a 50 million-year-old fossilized spider?

The results are above. They mark the first use of VHR-CT on a fossil preserved in amber, and the Belgian researchers who took the pictures say that the technique, which “generates full 3D reconstructions of minute fossils and permits digital dissection of the specimen to reveal the preservation of internal organs,” could revolutionize the study of these otherwise clouded windows into prehistory.

Image: University of Manchester

cwnl:

“It’s full of Stars!”
Location: La Silla, Mountain top in Chile
On clear, moonless nights, the stars still come out with a vengance above the high-altitude La Silla astronomical observatory.
Credit: Nico Housen, European Southern Observatory

cwnl:

“It’s full of Stars!”

Location: La Silla, Mountain top in Chile

On clear, moonless nights, the stars still come out with a vengance above the high-altitude La Silla astronomical observatory.

Credit: Nico Housen, European Southern Observatory

alchymista:

Magnetic Soap Could Help in Oil-Spill Clean-Ups
An international team of scientists has demonstrated the first soap that responds to magnets. This means the soap and the materials that it dissolves can be removed easily by applying a magnetic field.
Details of the new soap, which contains iron atoms, are reported in the chemistry journal Angewandte Chemie. It is similar to ordinary soap, but the atoms of iron help form tiny particles that are easily removed magnetically.
Experts say that with further development, it could find applications in cleaning up oil spills and waste water.

alchymista:

Magnetic Soap Could Help in Oil-Spill Clean-Ups

An international team of scientists has demonstrated the first soap that responds to magnets. This means the soap and the materials that it dissolves can be removed easily by applying a magnetic field.

Details of the new soap, which contains iron atoms, are reported in the chemistry journal Angewandte Chemie. It is similar to ordinary soap, but the atoms of iron help form tiny particles that are easily removed magnetically.

Experts say that with further development, it could find applications in cleaning up oil spills and waste water.

ikenbot:

Dead Spacecraft on Mars Spotted in New Photos
A NASA probe orbiting Mars has captured new photos of two dead spacecraft frozen in place at their Red Planet graves.
The photos were taken by NASA’s powerful Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), which has been circling the planet since 2006.
The spacecraft first spied NASA’s dead Phoenix Mars Lander in the Martian arctic on Jan. 26 in a color photo that reveals the lander and its frigid surroundings as they appeared following Phoenix’s second winter on the planet. The Phoenix spacecraft landed successfully on Mars in 2008.
In a separate photo, MRO also spotted the three-petal landing platform that delivered NASA’s Mars rover Spirit to the surface of the Red Planet in January 2004. The platform used parachutes and airbags to bounce to a stop on Gusev crater so the Spirit rover could begin its mission.

ikenbot:

Dead Spacecraft on Mars Spotted in New Photos

A NASA probe orbiting Mars has captured new photos of two dead spacecraft frozen in place at their Red Planet graves.

The photos were taken by NASA’s powerful Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), which has been circling the planet since 2006.

The spacecraft first spied NASA’s dead Phoenix Mars Lander in the Martian arctic on Jan. 26 in a color photo that reveals the lander and its frigid surroundings as they appeared following Phoenix’s second winter on the planet. The Phoenix spacecraft landed successfully on Mars in 2008.

In a separate photo, MRO also spotted the three-petal landing platform that delivered NASA’s Mars rover Spirit to the surface of the Red Planet in January 2004. The platform used parachutes and airbags to bounce to a stop on Gusev crater so the Spirit rover could begin its mission.

joshbyard:

Researchers Create Working Transistor Out of Single Atom:

Researchers have created a working transistor out of a single phosphorus atom and in the process have shown that Moore’s Law, the cornerstone of the semiconductor industry, might hold true much longer than anyone expected.
To make their tiny transistor, the group, which was led by Michelle Simmons, a researcher at the University of New South Wales, in Australia, bathed silicon in phosphine gas. They then used a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and a technique common in lithography to replace one silicon atom in a six-atom lattice with a phosphorus atom.
“Controlling a chemical reaction so that just one phosphorus atom was introduced into the device was challenging,” says Simmons.
When the team—which also included researchers from the Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information, Purdue University, and the universities of Sydney and Melbourne—applied a voltage across the phosphorus atom, it behaved like a transistor, switching and amplifying an electrical current.

(via A Single-Atom Transistor - IEEE Spectrum)

joshbyard:

Researchers Create Working Transistor Out of Single Atom:

Researchers have created a working transistor out of a single phosphorus atom and in the process have shown that Moore’s Law, the cornerstone of the semiconductor industry, might hold true much longer than anyone expected.

To make their tiny transistor, the group, which was led by Michelle Simmons, a researcher at the University of New South Wales, in Australia, bathed silicon in phosphine gas. They then used a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and a technique common in lithography to replace one silicon atom in a six-atom lattice with a phosphorus atom.

“Controlling a chemical reaction so that just one phosphorus atom was introduced into the device was challenging,” says Simmons.

When the team—which also included researchers from the Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information, Purdue University, and the universities of Sydney and Melbourne—applied a voltage across the phosphorus atom, it behaved like a transistor, switching and amplifying an electrical current.

(via A Single-Atom Transistor - IEEE Spectrum)

ikenbot:

Coronographe, Pic du Midi
Copyright: Pascal Drabik
The Pic du Midi de Bigorre or simply Pic du Midi (altitude 2,877 m (9,439 ft)) is a mountain in the French Pyrenees famous for its astronomical observatory, the Observatoire du Pic du Midi de Bigorre (Pic du Midi Observatory), part of the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées (Midi-Pyrénées Observatory).

ikenbot:

Coronographe, Pic du Midi

Copyright: Pascal Drabik

The Pic du Midi de Bigorre or simply Pic du Midi (altitude 2,877 m (9,439 ft)) is a mountain in the French Pyrenees famous for its astronomical observatory, the Observatoire du Pic du Midi de Bigorre (Pic du Midi Observatory), part of the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées (Midi-Pyrénées Observatory).

8bitfuture:

Fibre-optic screens could lead to longer battery life in laptops.
A new technique developed by L.E.S.S. (Light Efficient SystemS) could lead to a 30% reduction in energy use in computer screens, which account for around half of the energy use in laptops. The fibre-optic technique they have developed could find its way into commercial products in around four to five years.

Laptop screens are composed of different filters for colors and of a source of white light situated in the lower portion of the frame. With LED, which is currently used, 60% of the light remains trapped inside these diodes and accounts for a significant loss in efficiency. The fiber optics developed by L.E.S.S. could bring just as much luminosity and contrast while conserving a quarter of the energy. “That liberated power could be used by the processor to gain speed,” adds the entrepreneur.

8bitfuture:

Fibre-optic screens could lead to longer battery life in laptops.

A new technique developed by L.E.S.S. (Light Efficient SystemS) could lead to a 30% reduction in energy use in computer screens, which account for around half of the energy use in laptops. The fibre-optic technique they have developed could find its way into commercial products in around four to five years.

Laptop screens are composed of different filters for colors and of a source of white light situated in the lower portion of the frame. With LED, which is currently used, 60% of the light remains trapped inside these diodes and accounts for a significant loss in efficiency. The fiber optics developed by L.E.S.S. could bring just as much luminosity and contrast while conserving a quarter of the energy. “That liberated power could be used by the processor to gain speed,” adds the entrepreneur.