Whisper of the Wind

Credit: Dave Brosha

Whisper of the Wind

Credit: Dave Brosha

cwnl:

these were nice

Hey dad
you’re reading this, right?
yeah.

cwnl:

these were nice

Hey dad

you’re reading this, right?

yeah.

cwnl:

Eclipsed Moon in the Morning
Image Credit & Copyright: Babak Tafreshi

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Eclipsed Moon in the Morning

Image Credit & Copyright: Babak Tafreshi

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Aurora Snake over Norway
A dancing aurora takes on the shape of a snake as it was captured through a fish-eye camera view by the photographer. Aurorae are quite frequent in Norway, especially during Solar Maxima
Copyright: Sebastian Voltmer

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Aurora Snake over Norway

A dancing aurora takes on the shape of a snake as it was captured through a fish-eye camera view by the photographer. Aurorae are quite frequent in Norway, especially during Solar Maxima

Copyright: Sebastian Voltmer

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Moonrise at Temple of Poseidon
A harvest moon, or the full moon that occurs closest to the autumnal equinox, is seen rising behind what’s left of the ancient ruins at the Temple of Poseidon in Greece.
Image Copyright: Chris Kotsiopoulos

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Moonrise at Temple of Poseidon

A harvest moon, or the full moon that occurs closest to the autumnal equinox, is seen rising behind what’s left of the ancient ruins at the Temple of Poseidon in Greece.

Image Copyright: Chris Kotsiopoulos


Border of a Terrestrial Shade
Copyright: Evgeniy Bogatikov

Border of a Terrestrial Shade

Copyright: Evgeniy Bogatikov

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Milky Way over Thunderstorm
A scenic thunderous landscape is rivaled by the vastness and reverence of our home galaxy the Milky Way in this timely shot.
Image Copyright: Kevin Black

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Milky Way over Thunderstorm

A scenic thunderous landscape is rivaled by the vastness and reverence of our home galaxy the Milky Way in this timely shot.

Image Copyright: Kevin Black

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Fish Eye & The Forest
A fish eye view on a clear northern night in a forest in Finland.
by Pekka Parviainen

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Fish Eye & The Forest

A fish eye view on a clear northern night in a forest in Finland.

by Pekka Parviainen


Comet Lovejoy & The Laser
Comet Lovejoy is seen passing behind the VLT-Laser Guide Star as a waning Crescent Moon enjoys a spotlight in this image.
Copyright: Gabriel Brammer

Comet Lovejoy & The Laser

Comet Lovejoy is seen passing behind the VLT-Laser Guide Star as a waning Crescent Moon enjoys a spotlight in this image.

Copyright: Gabriel Brammer

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Crescent Moon & Mercury at Dawn
Copyright: Stefano De Rosa

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Crescent Moon & Mercury at Dawn

Copyright: Stefano De Rosa

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Comet Lovejoy over Argentina
Copyright: Luis Argerich

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Comet Lovejoy over Argentina

Copyright: Luis Argerich

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The Milky Way at 5000 Meters
by Serge Brunier

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The Milky Way at 5000 Meters

by Serge Brunier

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Milky Way’s Color Is White As a Morning’s Snow
Our galaxy is aptly named the Milky Way — it looks white, the color of fresh spring snow in the early morning, scientists now reveal.
Color is a key detail of galaxies, shedding light on its history of star formation. Unfortunately, since we are located well within our galaxy, clouds of gas and dust obscure all but the closest regions of the galaxy from view, keeping us from directly seeing what color our galaxy is as a whole.
“We can really only see 1,000 to 2,000 light-years in any direction — the Milky Way is 100,000 light-years across,” said study co-author Jeffrey Newman at the University of Pittsburgh. “The problem is similar to determining the overall color of the Earth when you’re only able to tell what Pennsylvania looks like.”
To sidestep this problem, astronomers decided to look at other galaxies’ colors to figure out the hue of our own. The reasoning is that galaxies whose other properties closely match the Milky Way’s likely can tell us what our galaxy’s color is.

cwnl:

Milky Way’s Color Is White As a Morning’s Snow

Our galaxy is aptly named the Milky Way — it looks white, the color of fresh spring snow in the early morning, scientists now reveal.

Color is a key detail of galaxies, shedding light on its history of star formation. Unfortunately, since we are located well within our galaxy, clouds of gas and dust obscure all but the closest regions of the galaxy from view, keeping us from directly seeing what color our galaxy is as a whole.

“We can really only see 1,000 to 2,000 light-years in any direction — the Milky Way is 100,000 light-years across,” said study co-author Jeffrey Newman at the University of Pittsburgh. “The problem is similar to determining the overall color of the Earth when you’re only able to tell what Pennsylvania looks like.”

To sidestep this problem, astronomers decided to look at other galaxies’ colors to figure out the hue of our own. The reasoning is that galaxies whose other properties closely match the Milky Way’s likely can tell us what our galaxy’s color is.

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Milky Way, Comet Lovejoy, & the Large Magellan Cloud
Copyright: Luis Argerich

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Milky Way, Comet Lovejoy, & the Large Magellan Cloud

Copyright: Luis Argerich

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“It’s full of Stars!”
Location: La Silla, Mountain top in Chile
On clear, moonless nights, the stars still come out with a vengance above the high-altitude La Silla astronomical observatory.
Credit: Nico Housen, European Southern Observatory

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“It’s full of Stars!”

Location: La Silla, Mountain top in Chile

On clear, moonless nights, the stars still come out with a vengance above the high-altitude La Silla astronomical observatory.

Credit: Nico Housen, European Southern Observatory