genuhveeev:

last one.gn xx 

genuhveeev:

last one.
gn xx 

cwnl:

Totality over the Temple of Poseidon at Sounion
Copyright: Anthony Ayiomamitis

cwnl:

Totality over the Temple of Poseidon at Sounion

Copyright: Anthony Ayiomamitis

cwnl:

Moonrise at Temple of Poseidon
A harvest moon, or the full moon that occurs closest to the autumnal equinox, is seen rising behind what’s left of the ancient ruins at the Temple of Poseidon in Greece.
Image Copyright: Chris Kotsiopoulos

cwnl:

Moonrise at Temple of Poseidon

A harvest moon, or the full moon that occurs closest to the autumnal equinox, is seen rising behind what’s left of the ancient ruins at the Temple of Poseidon in Greece.

Image Copyright: Chris Kotsiopoulos

cwnl:

Milky Way over Thunderstorm
A scenic thunderous landscape is rivaled by the vastness and reverence of our home galaxy the Milky Way in this timely shot.
Image Copyright: Kevin Black

cwnl:

Milky Way over Thunderstorm

A scenic thunderous landscape is rivaled by the vastness and reverence of our home galaxy the Milky Way in this timely shot.

Image Copyright: Kevin Black

cwnl:

Fish Eye & The Forest
A fish eye view on a clear northern night in a forest in Finland.
by Pekka Parviainen

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Fish Eye & The Forest

A fish eye view on a clear northern night in a forest in Finland.

by Pekka Parviainen


Comet Lovejoy & The Laser
Comet Lovejoy is seen passing behind the VLT-Laser Guide Star as a waning Crescent Moon enjoys a spotlight in this image.
Copyright: Gabriel Brammer

Comet Lovejoy & The Laser

Comet Lovejoy is seen passing behind the VLT-Laser Guide Star as a waning Crescent Moon enjoys a spotlight in this image.

Copyright: Gabriel Brammer

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Comet Lovejoy over Argentina
Copyright: Luis Argerich

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Comet Lovejoy over Argentina

Copyright: Luis Argerich

cwnl:

Milky Way’s Color Is White As a Morning’s Snow
Our galaxy is aptly named the Milky Way — it looks white, the color of fresh spring snow in the early morning, scientists now reveal.
Color is a key detail of galaxies, shedding light on its history of star formation. Unfortunately, since we are located well within our galaxy, clouds of gas and dust obscure all but the closest regions of the galaxy from view, keeping us from directly seeing what color our galaxy is as a whole.
“We can really only see 1,000 to 2,000 light-years in any direction — the Milky Way is 100,000 light-years across,” said study co-author Jeffrey Newman at the University of Pittsburgh. “The problem is similar to determining the overall color of the Earth when you’re only able to tell what Pennsylvania looks like.”
To sidestep this problem, astronomers decided to look at other galaxies’ colors to figure out the hue of our own. The reasoning is that galaxies whose other properties closely match the Milky Way’s likely can tell us what our galaxy’s color is.

cwnl:

Milky Way’s Color Is White As a Morning’s Snow

Our galaxy is aptly named the Milky Way — it looks white, the color of fresh spring snow in the early morning, scientists now reveal.

Color is a key detail of galaxies, shedding light on its history of star formation. Unfortunately, since we are located well within our galaxy, clouds of gas and dust obscure all but the closest regions of the galaxy from view, keeping us from directly seeing what color our galaxy is as a whole.

“We can really only see 1,000 to 2,000 light-years in any direction — the Milky Way is 100,000 light-years across,” said study co-author Jeffrey Newman at the University of Pittsburgh. “The problem is similar to determining the overall color of the Earth when you’re only able to tell what Pennsylvania looks like.”

To sidestep this problem, astronomers decided to look at other galaxies’ colors to figure out the hue of our own. The reasoning is that galaxies whose other properties closely match the Milky Way’s likely can tell us what our galaxy’s color is.

astronomnomy:


What makes the northern lights so pretty?
This stunning image of the Aurora Borealis was taken in the past week by Bjørn Jørgensen (click through to see the photographer’s page). So stunning in fact, I’ve seen it pass through my dash four times as it gets reblogged around. We’ve all heard that increased solar activity and solar flares aimed at the Earth can make the aurorae brighter, but what’s actually going on?
When the Sun has a coronal mass ejection, the event is so violent that large amounts of hot plasma (an electron/proton high energy soup) is hurled towards us. Now, this plasma is always being puffed off the Sun in small amounts as the solar wind, but a solar flare acts as a big boost to this. Lucky for us that the Earth’s magnetic field can protect us from the solar wind by redirecting this plasma around us and to the poles.
But this is where the fun starts. The electrons and protons in the plasma interact with molecules in the atmosphere in one of two ways: either by knocking off an electron and “ionising” the molecule, making it charged, or by “exciting” an electron in that molecule. Both of these methods put the molecule in a higher energy state, and nothing in the Universe likes being in a higher energy state, it’s unstable. After a while the molecule will either neutralise by finding another electron, or the electron in the molecule spontaneously de-excites back to how it was (“the ground state”). In both cases, a photon (a packet of light) is released with the lost energy, a bit like sweating to cool down. These are specific interactions at specific energies though, and so the photons all have similar energies, which means the light all has similar colours rather than being a rainbow mess.
When oxygen spontaneously de-excites, green or brown-ish light is given off, depending on how excited the oxygen molecule was
When nitrogen de-excites, it gives off red light
When nitrogen neutralises, it gives off blue light
So in this picture, there’s a lot of spontaneously de-exciting oxygen molecules! You get colour gradients because the brown-oxygen emission takes a long time to happen and sometimes the molecule collides with another, stopping this brown emission happening. So the brown-emission is more likely to happen when there’s not as many particles about i.e. at high altitude. And obviously, the stronger the solar the wind, the more of these collisions and excitations and emissions happen, so the brighter the aurorae!

astronomnomy:

What makes the northern lights so pretty?

This stunning image of the Aurora Borealis was taken in the past week by Bjørn Jørgensen (click through to see the photographer’s page). So stunning in fact, I’ve seen it pass through my dash four times as it gets reblogged around. We’ve all heard that increased solar activity and solar flares aimed at the Earth can make the aurorae brighter, but what’s actually going on?

When the Sun has a coronal mass ejection, the event is so violent that large amounts of hot plasma (an electron/proton high energy soup) is hurled towards us. Now, this plasma is always being puffed off the Sun in small amounts as the solar wind, but a solar flare acts as a big boost to this. Lucky for us that the Earth’s magnetic field can protect us from the solar wind by redirecting this plasma around us and to the poles.

But this is where the fun starts. The electrons and protons in the plasma interact with molecules in the atmosphere in one of two ways: either by knocking off an electron and “ionising” the molecule, making it charged, or by “exciting” an electron in that molecule. Both of these methods put the molecule in a higher energy state, and nothing in the Universe likes being in a higher energy state, it’s unstable. After a while the molecule will either neutralise by finding another electron, or the electron in the molecule spontaneously de-excites back to how it was (“the ground state”). In both cases, a photon (a packet of light) is released with the lost energy, a bit like sweating to cool down. These are specific interactions at specific energies though, and so the photons all have similar energies, which means the light all has similar colours rather than being a rainbow mess.

  • When oxygen spontaneously de-excites, green or brown-ish light is given off, depending on how excited the oxygen molecule was
  • When nitrogen de-excites, it gives off red light
  • When nitrogen neutralises, it gives off blue light

So in this picture, there’s a lot of spontaneously de-exciting oxygen molecules! You get colour gradients because the brown-oxygen emission takes a long time to happen and sometimes the molecule collides with another, stopping this brown emission happening. So the brown-emission is more likely to happen when there’s not as many particles about i.e. at high altitude. And obviously, the stronger the solar the wind, the more of these collisions and excitations and emissions happen, so the brighter the aurorae!

ikenbot:

Let’s Pretend
by Micke Woxberg

ikenbot:

Let’s Pretend

by Micke Woxberg

ikenbot:

Andes Milky Way
by Stephane Guisard

ikenbot:

Andes Milky Way

by Stephane Guisard

ikenbot:

Night at Dokdo
by Kwon O Chul
Stars trail around the north celestial pole over the coast of Dokdo island.

ikenbot:

Night at Dokdo

by Kwon O Chul

Stars trail around the north celestial pole over the coast of Dokdo island.

ikenbot:

Last Man Standing
by Oshin D. Zakarian
The Moon meets with Jupiter (middle) and Venus (upper middle) in the evening sky. The Pleiades star cluster in constellation Taurus is also visible above Venus.

ikenbot:

Last Man Standing

by Oshin D. Zakarian

The Moon meets with Jupiter (middle) and Venus (upper middle) in the evening sky. The Pleiades star cluster in constellation Taurus is also visible above Venus.